Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan flag
Skills available for Saskatchewan grade 9 math curriculum

Objectives are in black and IXL math skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practise that skill.

Show alignments for:

N9 Number

P9 Patterns and Relations

SS9 Shape and Space

  • SS9.1 Demonstrate understanding of circle properties including:

    • SS9.1.1 perpendicular line segments from the centre of a circle to a chord bisect the chord

    • SS9.1.2 inscribed angles subtended by the same arc have the same measure

    • SS9.1.3 the measure of a central angle is twice the measure of an inscribed angle subtending the same arc

    • SS9.1.4 tangents to a circle are perpendicular to the radius ending at the point of tangency.

    • SS9.1.a Observe and describe situations relevant to self, family, or community that involve circles, chords, central angles, inscribed angles, radii, arcs, and/or points of tangency.

    • SS9.1.b Construct a tangent line to a circle by applying the knowledge that a tangent line to the circle is perpendicular to a radius of the circle.

    • SS9.1.c Generalize, from personal explorations, the relationship between the measures of inscribed angles subtended by the same arc.

    • SS9.1.d Generalize, from personal explorations, the relationship between the measure of a central angle and the measure of inscribed angles subtended by the same arc.

    • SS9.1.e Generalize, from personal explorations, the relationship between a perpendicular line segment from the centre of a circle to a chord and the chord.

    • SS9.1.f Model how to find the diameter of a circle using an inscribed angle of 90° and explain why the strategy works.

    • SS9.1.g Describe examples of where First Nations and Métis, past and present, lifestyles and worldviews demonstrate one or more of the circle properties (e.g., tipi and medicine wheel).

    • SS9.1.h Solve a situational question involving the application of one or more of the circle properties.

  • SS9.2 Extend understanding of area to surface area of right rectangular prisms, right cylinders, right triangular prisms, to composite 3-D objects.

    • SS9.2.a Describe 3-D composite objects from the natural and constructed world, including objects relevant to First Nations and Métis people (e.g., Mesoamerican pyramids).

    • SS9.2.b Analyze a composite 3-D object to identify areas of overlap and explain the impact of these areas on determining the surface area of the composite 3-D object.

    • SS9.2.c Critique the statement "To find the surface area of a composite 3-D object, add together the surface areas of the individual 3-D objects from which the composite 3-D object is comprised".

    • SS9.2.d Determine the surface area of composite 3-D objects.

    • SS9.2.e Solve situational questions involving the surface area of composite 3-D objects.

    • SS9.2.f Give dimensions for a single 3-D object that will have the same surface area as a composite 3-D object.

    • SS9.2.g Approximate the surface area of a 3-D object from the natural environment using composites of standard 3-D objects such as right rectangular prisms, right cylinders, and right triangular prisms.

  • SS9.3. Demonstrate understanding of similarity of 2-D shapes.

  • SS9.4 Demonstrate understanding of line and rotation symmetry.

    • SS9.4.a Observe and describe examples of line and rotation symmetry in situations relevant to self, family, or community.

    • SS9.4.b Classify different 2-D shapes or designs made of 2-D shapes, according to the number of lines of symmetry.

    • SS9.4.c Complete a 2-D shape or design given part of a shape or design and one or more lines of symmetry.

    • SS9.4.d Determine, with justification, if a given 2-D shape or design has rotation symmetry about the point at the centre of the shape or design and, if it does, state the order and angle of rotation.

    • SS9.4.e Identify a line of symmetry, or the order and angle of rotation symmetry, in a given tessellation.

    • SS9.4.f Describe examples of the use and significance of line and rotation symmetry in First Nations and Métis art.

    • SS9.4.g Analyze different transformations of 2-D shapes on the Cartesian plane and describe the type of symmetry, if any, that results.

    • SS9.4.h Determine whether or not two 2-D shapes on the Cartesian plane are related by either rotation or line symmetry and explain.

    • SS9.4.i Create or provide an art work (such as a painting or dance) that demonstrates line and rotation symmetry, and identify the line(s) of symmetry and the order and angle of rotation.

SP9 Statistics and Probability

  • SP9.1 Demonstrate understanding of the effect of:

    • SP9.1.1 bias

    • SP9.1.2 use of language

    • SP9.1.3 ethics

    • SP9.1.4 cost

    • SP9.1.5 time and timing

    • SP9.1.6 privacy

    • SP9.1.7 cultural sensitivity and

    • SP9.1.8 population or sample on data collection.

    • SP9.1.a Analyze given case studies of data collection, including data pertaining to First Nations and Métis peoples, and identify potential problems related to bias, use of language, ethics, cost, time and timing, privacy, or cultural sensitivity.

    • SP9.1.b Provide examples to illustrate how bias, use of language, ethics, cost, time and timing, privacy, or cultural sensitivity may influence the data collected.

    • SP9.1.c Identify situations relevant to self, family, or community where a set of data was collected and classify each situation as involving a sample or the population.

    • SP9.1.d Provide an example of a situation in which a population may be used to answer a question, and justify the choice.

    • SP9.1.e Provide an example of a question where a limitation precludes the use of a population and describe the limitation (e.g., too costly, not enough time, limited resources).

    • SP9.1.f Identify and critique given examples in which a generalization from a sample of a population, including from First Nations and Métis data, may or may not be valid for the population.

    • SP9.1.g Explain different strategies for trying to minimize negative effects on data collection.

    • SP9.1.h Explain the importance of protocols for respectful data collection and information sharing.

  • SP9.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the collection, display, and analysis of data through a project.

  • SP9.3 Demonstrate an understanding of the role of probability in society.

    • SP9.3.a Observe examples of probabilities that impact or influence aspects of one's self, family, community, or environment and describe those impacts or influences.

    • SP9.3.b Analyze the meaningfulness of a probability against the limitations of assumptions associated with that probability.

    • SP9.3.c Provide examples of how a single probability could be used to support opposing positions.

    • SP9.3.d Explain, using examples, how decisions based on probability may be a combination of theoretical probability, experimental probability, and subjective judgement.

  • SP9.4 Research and present how First Nations and Métis peoples, past and present, envision, represent, and make use of probability and statistics.

    • SP9.4.a Gather and document information regarding the significance and use of probability and statistics for at least one First Nation or Métis peoples from a variety of sources such as Elders and traditional knowledge keepers.

    • SP9.4.b Compare the significance, representation, and use of probability and statistics for different First Nations and Métis peoples, and other cultures.

    • SP9.4.c Communicate concretely, pictorially, orally, visually, physically, and/or in writing, what has been learned about the envisioning, representing, and use of probability and statistics by First Nations and Métis peoples and how these understandings parallel, differ from, and enhance one's own mathematical understandings about probability and statistics.