Alberta

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Skills available for Alberta grade 5 math curriculum

Objectives are in black and IXL math skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practise that skill.

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N Number

PR Patterns and Relations

SS Shape and Space

  • SS.1 Use direct and indirect measurement to solve problems.

    • SS.1.1 Identify 90º angles.

      • SS.1.1.1 Provide examples of 90º angles in the environment.

      • SS.1.1.2 Sketch 90º angles without the use of a protractor.

      • SS.1.1.3 Label a 90º angle, using a symbol.

    • SS.1.2 Design and construct different rectangles, given either perimeter or area, or both (whole numbers), and make generalizations.

      • SS.1.2.1 Construct or draw two or more rectangles for a given perimeter in a problem-solving context.

      • SS.1.2.2 Construct or draw two or more rectangles for a given area in a problem-solving context.

      • SS.1.2.3 Determine the shape that will result in the greatest area for any given perimeter.

      • SS.1.2.4 Determine the shape that will result in the least area for any given perimeter.

      • SS.1.2.5 Provide a real-life context for when it is important to consider the relationship between area and perimeter.

    • SS.1.3 Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (mm) by:

      • SS.1.3.a selecting and justifying referents for the unit mm.

      • SS.1.3.b modelling and describing the relationship between mm and cm units, and between mm and m units.

      • SS.1.3.1 Provide a referent for one millimetre, and explain the choice.

      • SS.1.3.2 Provide a referent for one centimetre, and explain the choice.

      • SS.1.3.3 Provide a referent for one metre, and explain the choice.

      • SS.1.3.4 Show that 10 millimetres is equivalent to 1 centimetre, using concrete materials; e.g., a ruler.

      • SS.1.3.5 Show that 1000 millimetres is equivalent to 1 metre, using concrete materials; e.g., a metre stick.

      • SS.1.3.6 Provide examples of when millimetres are used as the unit of measure.

    • SS.1.4 Demonstrate an understanding of volume by:

    • SS.1.5 Demonstrate an understanding of capacity by:

      • SS.1.5.a describing the relationship between mL and L.

      • SS.1.5.b selecting and justifying referents for mL or L units.

      • SS.1.5.c estimating capacity, using referents for mL or L.

      • SS.1.5.d measuring and recording capacity (mL or L).

      • SS.1.5.1 Demonstrate that 1000 millilitres is equivalent to 1 litre by filling a 1 litre container using a combination of smaller containers.

      • SS.1.5.2 Provide a referent for a litre, and explain the choice.

      • SS.1.5.3 Provide a referent for a millilitre, and explain the choice.

      • SS.1.5.4 Determine the capacity unit of a given referent.

      • SS.1.5.5 Estimate the capacity of a given container, using personal referents.

      • SS.1.5.6 Determine the capacity of a given container, using materials that take the shape of the inside of the container (e.g., a liquid, rice, sand, beads), and explain the strategy.

  • SS.2 Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them.

    • SS.2.6 Describe and provide examples of edges and faces of 3-D objects, and sides of 2-D shapes that are:

      • SS.2.6.a parallel.

      • SS.2.6.b intersecting.

      • SS.2.6.c perpendicular.

      • SS.2.6.d vertical.

      • SS.2.6.e horizontal.

      • SS.2.6.1 Identify parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal edges and faces on 3-D objects.

      • SS.2.6.2 Identify parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal sides on 2-D shapes.

      • SS.2.6.3 Provide examples from the environment that show parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal line segments.

      • SS.2.6.4 Find examples of edges, faces and sides that are parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal in print and electronic media, such as newspapers, magazines and the Internet.

      • SS.2.6.5 Draw 2-D shapes that have sides that are parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical or horizontal.

      • SS.2.6.6 Draw 3-D objects that have edges and faces that are parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical or horizontal.

      • SS.2.6.7 Describe the faces and edges of a given 3-D object, using terms such as parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical or horizontal.

      • SS.2.6.8 Describe the sides of a given 2-D shape, using terms such as parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical or horizontal.

    • SS.2.7 Identify and sort quadrilaterals, including:

  • SS.3 Describe and analyze position and motion of objects and shapes.

    • SS.3.8 Identify and describe a single transformation, including a translation, rotation and reflection of 2-D shapes.

      • SS.3.8.1 Provide an example of a translation, rotation and reflection.

      • SS.3.8.2 Identify a given single transformation as a translation, rotation or reflection.

      • SS.3.8.3 Describe a given rotation about a vertex by the direction of the turn (clockwise or counterclockwise).

      • SS.3.8.4 Describe a given reflection by identifying the line of reflection and the distance of the image from the line of reflection.

      • SS.3.8.5 Describe a given translation by identifying the direction and magnitude of the movement.

    • SS.3.9 Perform, concretely, a single transformation (translation, rotation or reflection) of a 2-D shape, and draw the image.

      • SS.3.9.1 Translate a given 2-D shape horizontally, vertically or diagonally, and draw the resultant image.

      • SS.3.9.2 Rotate a given 2-D shape about a vertex, and describe the direction of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise) and the fraction of the turn (limited to ¼, ½, ¾ or full turn).

      • SS.3.9.3 Reflect a given 2-D shape across a line of reflection, and draw the resultant image.

      • SS.3.9.4 Draw a 2-D shape, translate the shape, and record the translation by describing the direction and magnitude of the movement.

      • SS.3.9.5 Draw a 2-D shape, rotate the shape about a vertex, and describe the direction of the turn (clockwise or counterclockwise) and the fraction of the turn (limited to ¼, ½, ¾ or full turn).

      • SS.3.9.6 Draw a 2-D shape, reflect the shape, and identify the line of reflection and the distance of the image from the line of reflection.

      • SS.3.9.7 Predict the result of a single transformation of a 2-D shape, and verify the prediction.

SP Statistics and Probability

  • SP.1 Collect, display and analyze data to solve problems.

    • SP.1.1 Differentiate between first-hand and second-hand data.

      • SP.1.1.1 Explain the difference between first-hand and second-hand data.

      • SP.1.1.2 Formulate a question that can best be answered using first-hand data, and explain why.

      • SP.1.1.3 Formulate a question that can best be answered using second-hand data, and explain why.

      • SP.1.1.4 Find examples of second-hand data in print and electronic media, such as newspapers, magazines and the Internet.

    • SP.1.2 Construct and interpret double bar graphs to draw conclusions.

      • SP.1.2.1 Determine the attributes (title, axes, intervals and legend) of double bar graphs by comparing a given set of double bar graphs.

      • SP.1.2.2 Represent a given set of data by creating a double bar graph, label the title and axes, and create a legend without the use of technology.

      • SP.1.2.3 Draw conclusions from a given double bar graph to answer questions.

      • SP.1.2.4 Provide examples of double bar graphs used in a variety of print and electronic media, such as newspapers, magazines and the Internet.

      • SP.1.2.5 Solve a given problem by constructing and interpreting a double bar graph.

  • SP.2 Use experimental or theoretical probabilities to represent and solve problems involving uncertainty.

    • SP.2.3 Describe the likelihood of a single outcome occurring, using words such as:

      • SP.2.3.a impossible.

      • SP.2.3.b possible.

      • SP.2.3.c certain.

      • SP.2.3.1 Provide examples of events from personal contexts that are impossible, possible or certain.

      • SP.2.3.2 Classify the likelihood of a single outcome occurring in a probability experiment as impossible, possible or certain.

      • SP.2.3.3 Design and conduct a probability experiment in which the likelihood of a single outcome occurring is impossible, possible or certain.

      • SP.2.3.4 Conduct a given probability experiment a number of times, record the outcomes, and explain the results.

    • SP.2.4 Compare the likelihood of two possible outcomes occurring, using words such as:

      • SP.2.4.a less likely.

      • SP.2.4.b equally likely.

      • SP.2.4.c more likely.

      • SP.2.4.1 Identify outcomes from a given probability experiment that are less likely, equally likely or more likely to occur than other outcomes.

      • SP.2.4.2 Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is less likely to occur than the other outcome.

      • SP.2.4.3 Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is equally likely to occur as the other outcome.

      • SP.2.4.4 Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is more likely to occur than the other outcome.