Nova Scotia

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Skills available for Nova Scotia grade 9 math curriculum

Objectives are in black and IXL math skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practise that skill.

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9.N Number

9.PR Patterns and Relations

9.M Measurement

  • Students will be expected to use direct and indirect measure to solve problems.

    • 9.M01 Students will be expected to solve problems and justify the solution strategy, using the following circle properties:
      • the perpendicular from the centre of a circle to a chord bisects the chord
      • the measure of the central angle is equal to twice the measure of the inscribed angle subtended by the same arc
      • the inscribed angles subtended by the same arc are congruent
      • a tangent to a circle is perpendicular to the radius at the point of tangency

9.G Geometry

9.SP Statistics and Probability

  • Data Analysis - Students will be expected to collect, display, and analyze data to solve problems.

    • 9.SP01 Students will be expected to describe the effect on the collection of data of bias, use of language, ethics, cost, time and timing, privacy, and cultural sensitivity.

      • 9.SP01.01 Analyze a given case study of data collection; and identify potential problems related to bias, use of language, ethics, cost, time and timing, privacy, or cultural sensitivity.

      • 9.SP01.02 Provide examples to illustrate how bias, use of language, ethics, cost, time and timing, privacy, or cultural sensitivity may influence data.

  • Chance and Uncertainty - Students will be expected to use experimental or theoretical probabilities to represent and solve problems involving uncertainty.

    • 9.SP02 Students will be expected to select and defend the choice of using either a population or a sample of a population to answer a question.

      • 9.SP02.01 Identify whether a given situation represents the use of a sample or a population.

      • 9.SP02.02 Provide an example of a situation in which a population may be used to answer a question, and justify the choice.

      • 9.SP02.03 Provide an example of a question where a limitation precludes the use of a population, and describe the limitation.

      • 9.SP02.04 Identify and critique a given example in which a generalization from a sample of a population may or may not be valid for the population.

      • 9.SP02.05 Provide an example to demonstrate the significance of sample size in interpreting data.

    • 9.SP03 Students will be expected to develop and implement a project plan for the collection, display, and analysis of data by:
      • formulating a question for investigation
      • choosing a data collection method that includes social considerations
      • selecting a population or a sample
      • collecting the data
      • displaying the collected data in an appropriate manner
      • drawing conclusions to answer the question

      • 9.SP03.01 Create a rubric to assess a project that includes the assessment of:
        • a question for investigation
        • the choice of a data collection method that includes social considerations
        • the selection of a population or a sample and the justification for the selection
        • the display of collected data
        • the conclusions to answer the question

      • 9.SP03.02 Develop a project plan that describes:
        • a question for investigation
        • the method of data collection that includes social considerations
        • the method for selecting a population or a sample
        • the methods for display and analysis of data

      • 9.SP03.03 Complete the project according to the plan, draw conclusions, and communicate findings to an audience.

      • 9.SP03.04 Self-assess the completed project by applying the rubric.

    • 9.SP04 Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the role of probability in society.

      • 9.SP04.01 Provide an example from print and electronic media where probability is used.

      • 9.SP04.02 Identify the assumptions associated with a given probability, and explain the limitations of each assumption.

      • 9.SP04.03 Explain how a single probability can be used to support opposing positions.

      • 9.SP04.04 Explain, using examples, how decisions may be based on a combination of theoretical probability, experimental probability, and subjective judgment.